The Hunte Group Realtors®


Posted by The Hunte Group Realtors® on 11/14/2017

Do you ever wonder if those items stored away in your attic or basement are worth any money? Most people assume that their antique furniture and family heirlooms couldn't be worth the trouble of finding out their value. However, there are some items that are currently taking up storage space that you could get quite a lot of money for. In this article, we'll cover some of the items you're likely to have that are worth a lot of money and how to find out just how much they're worth.

Collectibles

Some collectible items gain value as the years pass. Sometimes a craze becomes so popular (i.e., Pokemon cards) that people snatch up every item they can find hoping that someday they'll be worth thousands. In reality, it's hard to know what items will be worth something decades down the road. However, there are many items that are currently very valuable that you might have laying around in your attic (hopefully still in the original packaging!).
  • Rare vinyl records Your mom's stack of dusty Kenny Rogers records might not be worth much, but you should dig through and old records and look them up online to see how much they're going for. Some editions of Bob Dylan and The Beatles sell for tens of thousands of dollars. You never know...
  • Comics Just like rare records, rare comic books can sell for thousands to serious collectors. Condition is key, but if you find any comics in the attic you should ask an expert how much they go for.
  • Musical instruments Antique guitars, violins, and pianos are highly sought after by collectors. Four things make an antique instrument valuable: the person who made it, the person who played it, the condition it's in, and the quality of the instrument.
  • Designer fashion If grandma used to have a taste for high fashion, it might be a good idea to look into who made her old purses and jewelry. Similarly, if there is an old wrist watch or pocket watch in the attic, see if you can find any details about it online.
  • First edition books There's a good chance your grand parents or great grandparents were book readers. They didn't have the internet or video games so what else could they be doing all day? If they happened to collect some first editions of the classics, you're in luck--The Great Gatsby with the original dust jacket recently sold for an incredible $194,000.

Artwork

You can probably guess that paintings by prominent artists are some of the most valuable collectibles in the world. However, it doesn't take a van Gogh to turn a profit off of some old paintings and sculptures that might be sitting in your basement. When we say art, we also include things like movie posters and old signs and advertisements. An original Star Wars movie poster can go for up to $100,000.

Antique wooden furniture

You've probably seen old furniture selling for thousands on television. The important things to look out for when it comes to valuing your old furniture are: is it made of all original parts? What time period is it from? Why type of wood is it made of? Which company crafted it? Only an expert can answer these questions for you.




Tags: money   home   antique   antiques   valuable   collectibles   attic   basement  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by The Hunte Group Realtors® on 4/11/2017

When you drive through a new housing development does it seem like all of the homes are enormous compared to when you were growing up? You're not alone. In fact, over the last 40 years, average home sizes have increased by over 1,000 square feet. In other words, you could fit an entire small house inside of the amount homes have grown in size.

Why do Americans love huge houses?

It's counter-intuitive that home sizes should keep growing larger. Bigger houses mean higher prices, more maintenance, and more expensive utilities. To understand why, we need look no further than the automobile industry. In spite of the fact that larger vehicles cost more to buy, use more gas, and do more harm to the environment, people still buy bigger and bigger trucks and SUVs. There are a few reasons why. One is that they can afford to (or they can at least afford the payments). Another reason is cultural. For the most part, bigger meant better in American culture--until recently. Recently, many Americans have begun saying they would prefer smaller sized houses. That desire hasn't entirely caught up to the people building the homes, however. And even as simple living trends and the "tiny house" phenomenon gain traction, building contractors still stand the most to gain from large houses and the people with the money to build houses continue to build big to stay aligned with the other homes in their neighborhood. There are other obstacles in place for people who want a smaller house. Some counties around the U.S. now enforce minimum square footage requirements to uphold the building standards of the area. So, people hoping to move to a particular suburban area but don't want a huge house might be out of luck.

How big of a home do I need?

There are a lot of things to consider if you're buying a home. Size and cost often go hand-in-hand, but even if you can afford a larger home, do you really need the space? Here are some questions to ask yourself to determine how large of a house you really need:
  • Do I or will I have a family? Kids need space. They need bedrooms and places to play. The size of your family is going to be a huge factor in choosing the size of your home.
  • Do I need all this stuff? Many people use their homes like storage containers. Think about the last time you moved and what you brought with you. Now determine how often you used the things you brought. Odds are you have a lot of items just sitting around taking up space that you don't really need.
  • Do I have hobbies that take up a lot of space? Woodworking, working on cars, playing drums... these are all examples of hobbies that call for some leg room.
  • Am I a dog person? Just like kids, pets tend to take up some room. Larger dogs and energetic dogs require more room, both outside and inside the house.
  • Do I have time to keep up with the maintenance? Bigger houses means more windows to clean, more toilets to scrub, more grass to mow... you get the idea. You might find that you'd rather have a beautiful and well-kept small home than a hard-to-maintain huge one.





Posted by The Hunte Group Realtors® on 3/28/2017

If there's one thing more stressful than moving it's moving over long distances. Moving far away often means new jobs, new friends, and a new way of life. It's a big change that doesn't need to be made any more difficult by a complicated moving process. In this article, we'll cover some ways to prepare yourself for a long distance move so that you can rest easy knowing you're ready for this new chapter of your life.

A new home, a new lifestyle

If you're moving across the country you probably don't know where to begin when it comes to preparing yourself. A good place to start is with the basics of daily life. Ask yourself these questions before you start packing:
  • Do I have the right clothes? You don't need a whole new wardrobe before you move, but you don't want to brave a Northeast winter with just a sweatshirt either.
  • What can I get rid of? Think about all of the items you have and how much you use them. If you haven't used something in a year there's a good chance it's not worth hauling across the country.
  • How much space will I have? If you're moving into a house bigger than the one you have now you might not need to part with many bulky items. If not, consider having a yard sale before you move.
  • Do I know enough about where I'm moving?  When moving to a new place, you'll want to know where the closest hospitals, gas stations, and grocery stores are. Explore Google Maps and websites for the area you're moving to to get to know the place beforehand. Write down important addresses and telephone numbers.

Create a timeline

With all of the changes that are about to happen in your life, odds are you'll get overwhelmed with many of the details of moving. Create a moving timeline, whether it's in an app on your smartphone or on a piece of paper. On this timeline, write in dates you'll need to accomplish certain items by. Here are some sample items for your timeline:
  • Pick a move-in/move-out date by today
  • Choose a moving company by today
  • Sell or donate unwanted items by today
  • Sign paperwork and exchange keys today
  • Donate clothes by today
  • Going away party by today
  • Pack up office by today
  • Pack up living room by today

Packing your belongings

When packing for a long distance move there is more pressure to do it right and not forget anything. Follow these packing tips to ensure a safe travel:
  • Take inventory. Use an app that helps you categorize your belongings. Check off important items as they're packed and cross them off as they're unpacked at your new home.
  • Pack one room at a time. This will help you keep everything together and ensure you don't forget anything. It will make unpacking much easier.
  • Don't forget to label all your boxes. Keep that Sharpie in your back pocket at all times.
  • Communicate. Make sure everyone who is moving with you and helping you move are all on the same page when it comes to packing so that no details are overlooked.
  • Use extra padding. A longer drive means more opportunities for something to get broken along the way. Pack boxes full and put fragile items on the bottom of the truck.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by The Hunte Group Realtors® on 2/28/2017

Having different types of birds in your yard is a great way to add a bit of nature to your house. With their unique plumage and songs, birds will offer you interesting sights and sounds. However, you’ll need to offer them a few things in return. To attract a variety of birds to your yard you’ll need to make it the most desirable place in the neighborhood to be. Here’s a guide to help you attract a large variety of birds to your yard and to keep them coming back each year.

Choosing your feeders

When choosing a bird feeder there are a few traits your looking for. It should be strong enough to withstand the weather and sealed tightly to keep the seeds dry. You’ll want a feeder that is big enough to hold a variety of seeds and is relatively low-maintenance. Hanging tray feeders are the most common type, and for good reason. They attract a variety of birds and are easy to fill and clean. A good tray feeder has a drainage system in the tray to keep seeds dry, which means you should buy a feeder with a mesh bottom instead of solid. For nectar-seeking birds like hummingbirds, you’ll want a few small feeders rather than one large one. Keep it in a well lit area near some flowers to attract the hummingbirds. They’re attracted to bright colors to look for nectar and your fake-flower feeders will seem like a good source if they’re surrounded by the real thing. If you want to view birds from inside your home, window feeders are a great option. Window feeders suction right to your window and will offer you a close-up view of the birds who will slowly get used to you being on the other side of the glass.

Keeping the squirrels away

Putting out plenty of bird feeders won’t just attract birds. Squirrels, too love to eat the various seeds that are found in feeders. You have a couple options when it comes to squirrels. First, you can just accept them as part of the nature of your yard. They, too can be fun to watch and are just looking for something to eat like the birds. If inviting squirrels into your yard isn’t something you can live with, you could try deterring them with a squirrel baffle. Squirrel baffles wrap around the pole your feeder is on preventing the squirrel from climbing up to the tray. However, some crafty squirrels can still find their way through.

It takes more than seed

Just having bird seed isn’t enough to provide for birds. Having lots of trees and water is also a good way to keep the birds around. Bird baths are one option. But there are other creative ways to attract birds to your yard like a small natural pool or waterfall. Having a bubbler on your water source is also a great way to bring more birds to your yard as they will be attracted to the sound of the running water. Add these features to your yard and soon the local birds will find it an irresistible place to spend time.




Tags: bird feeding   home   yard   backyard   birds   feeder  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by The Hunte Group Realtors® on 1/24/2017

Staying in shape during the winter time isn’t easy. Colder weather means less time spent walking outdoors, jogging, or riding a bicycle. The days grow shorter and we get tired earlier when to sun is already on its way down as we leave work at night. All of these things combine to make it difficult to maintain fitness during the winter months.

Luckily, we live in a time when we have access to several great fitness resources right from our own home. In this article, we’ll cover some important tips to keep you moving this winter.

Skip the expensive machinery

As many fitness practitioners will tell you (except the the ones selling them on TV), most “home gym” systems are overpriced, difficult to move, take up a ton of room, and will probably turn into a hanger for your laundry after a few months.

Instead of spending a ton of money on exercise machines, go out and buy a good roll-up exercise or yoga mat and a couple weights.

The internet is your trainer and motivator

Many of us who buy gym memberships do so thinking that paying for something monthly will motivate us to use it. It’s easy to slip out of your schedule, however, and find yourself paying for a service you don’t use. Gyms that charge low monthly membership fees often have hefty cancellation fees. These gyms sign so many people up and then depend on them not to come every day, otherwise they would be extremely overcrowded.

Save your money, and try out various free routines on YouTube. There are videos in several different areas of fitness including yoga, pilates, dance, strengthening and cardio workouts, or even hula hooping.  

Don’t let impossible ideals ruin your good time

Fitness should be fun and rewarding. If you want to stick to it, choose an activity that you enjoy and don’t dread doing every day. If you can’t think of a physical activity you actually enjoy (trust me, I’m with you), then make your exercise something you look forward to by listening to your favorite podcasts while you do them.

So much of our consumer culture depends striving for an impossible to reach body standard. It can be hard for us to ignore, since women and men alike are taught these standards from birth. But to have the best results from your exercise, it should come from a place of pride and enjoyment in yourself and your body, not shame.

Make it social

If you aren’t great at holding yourself accountable (you aren’t alone) or just have more fun doing activities with others, making your routine a social act is a great way to make it a more rewarding and worthwhile experience. You can get your significant other, children, or even a rambunctious dog involved in staying active through the winter.




Tags: home   tips   fitness  
Categories: Uncategorized